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Open sessions

These open sessions are open to all, subject to availability. PARSE confernce delegates have priority. Welcome!

Please scroll down for abstracts.

  • Research Forum, seven short presentations
    Wednesday 15 November, 14.30-17.30
    Valand, Glasshouse
    Open session
  • Saving (G)Race: The (near) impossibility of Blackness in Architecture
    Craig Wilkins, architect, artist, lecturer at Taubman College, University of Michigan
    Wednesday 15 November, 18.00-19.00
    HDK, Baula
    Open session
  • giiwekii // they return home to the Land: Indigenous Art as Research in an Age of Ongoing Colonialism
    Dylan A.T. Miner, Director of American Indian and Indigenous Studies and Associate Professor in the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities at Michigan State University
    Thursday 16 November, 10.30-11.30
    Valand, Aula
    Open session and part of the Indigeneity strand
  • The Love of Violence. On chickens, Home and Geographies of exclusion
    Hagar Kotef, senior Lecturer in Political Theory and Comparative Politics, SOAS, University of London
    Thursday 16 November, 18.00-19.00
    HDK, Baula
    Open session
  • Vocabularies of Assembly, Assembling Vocabulary
    Shannon Jackson, Cyrus and Michelle Hadidi Chair in the Humanities at the University of California, Berkeley
    Friday 17 November, 10.00-11.00
    Valand, Aula
    Open session and part of the strand Vocabularies and Exclusion
  • “Crises”, Convulsions, Concurrences. About Human Mobility, the European Geography of “Exclusion” and the Postcolonial Dialectics of Subordinate Inclusion
    Nicholas de Genova, scholar of migration, borders, citizenship, race and labour
    Friday 17 November, 14.00-15.00
    HDK, Baula
    Open session and part of the strand Geographies of Exclusion
  • Exclusion and the Dead
    Marina Gržinić, professor at Academy of Fine Arts Vienna and researcher at the Institute of Philosophy, Research Center of the Slovenian Academy of Science and Arts, SRC-SASA
    Friday 17 November, 18.00-19.00
    Valand, Aula
    Open session
  • Konst:it choir
    Friday 17 November, 19.00-19.20
    Valand, Aula
    Open session

Abstracts

Research Forum, seven short presentations

Abstracts and more info on the Research forum are found on a separate page.

 

Saving (G)Race: The (near) impossibility of Blackness in Architecture

Craig Wilkins, architect, artist, lecturer at Taubman College, University of Michigan

Architects help shape the world around us. Their work is both poetic and powerful – it has the innate ability to both lift and oppress. Kim Dovey wrote that the will to form is really the will to inform; that the desire to build something is really the desire to say something. Since, in my experience, Black Folk always have something to say, why is it that there are so few people of color in architecture?

Despite being 12% of the population, African-Americans constitute a little more than 3% of the architectural faculty and 2% of all registered architects in the United States – the latter a number that has remained relatively flat for over 30 years while every other ethnic group has increased. It becomes highly probable that this under-representation is simply a natural occurrence. In The Aesthetics of Equity, I begin with the hypothesis that something other than desire or ability was responsible for this condition. In this talk, I will sketch the structures that have keep such conditions in place and offer strategies as to how they might be mitigated, if not dismantled.

giiwekii // they return home to the Land: Indigenous Art as Research in an Age of Ongoing Colonialism

Dylan AT Miner, Director of American Indian and Indigenous Studies and Associate Professor in the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities at Michigan State University

I am interested in thinking about the intimate relationship between visuality (ways of seeing), the tripartite system of colonialism–capitalism–heteropatriarchy, and inversely Indigenous ways of being. In this keynote, I will look at Indigenous art as ways that offer non-colonial ways of being. As is common in my writing and practice, I will employ Indigenous language and thought ↔ action.

For this lecture, I am currently thinking about and through the Anishinaabemowin terms giiwekii – ‘she/he/they return home to the Land’ – and aki-gikendamowin – ‘earth knowledge’. What implications do these have for artistic education and how Indigenous artists in non-Indigenous spaces navigate these ongoing colonial education systems.

In this talk I will discuss my own artistic practices, interrogate Indigenous and Western critical theory, apply Indigenous epistemologies, and discuss recent work by Indigenous artists that respond to ongoing ecological destruction (and its relationship with colonialism). Recent art and action against the Dakota Access Pipeline and other extractive industries have brought some of this into mainstream media attention.

The Love of Violence. On chickens, Home and Geographies of exclusion

Hagar Kotef, senior Lecturer in Political Theory and Comparative Politics, SOAS, University of London

This talk explores how people develop attachments to spaces of violence and exclusion by looking at “home” as a political category tying belonging to violence. Examining contexts of settler colonialism, particularly Israel/Palestine, where homes themselves are tools of dispossession, it asks how violence becomes formative of collective identities.

Within a larger mosaique of homes that are based on racial exclusions and the various modes of attachment to the violences embedded in these exclusions, the talk will focus on one radical outpost in the West Bank, called Givo’t Olam. Givo’t Olam is a chief supplier of organic produce and the largest supplier of free-range eggs in Israel. Examining both the ethics of organic food and the material conditions of organic agriculture (land resources, waste and water), I show how a home is created as a dispositional tool within an ethical scheme.

The talk therefore unfolds an ethic of violence in order to understand how a space can be sustained as “one’s own” (i.e.: “home”) when it is clearly, explicitly, and actively, based on an ongoing process of violent dispossession.

Vocabularies of Assembly, Assembling Vocabulary

Shannon Jackson, Cyrus and Michelle Hadidi Chair in the Humanities at the University of California, Berkeley

This lecture considers the poetics and politics of “assembly,” exploring how linguistic and performative conventions both welcome and exclude.  It draws from an ongoing research project on the use of the “keyword” to create online conversation on performance experiment: http://intermsofperformance.site/  It then sets this linguistic assembly inside a larger conversation about the political, aesthetic, and educational stakes of  “assembly” in a 21st century landscape, including contexts where the ‘right to free speech’ is paradoxically appropriated to perpetuate conditions of exclusion.  Throughout, Jackson considers how artists and critics address these changing conditions with alternative experiments in re-assembly.

“Crises”, Convulsions, Concurrences. About Human Mobility, the European Geography of “Exclusion” and the Postcolonial Dialectics of Subordinate Inclusion

Nicholas de Genova, scholar of migration, borders, citizenship, race and labour

Over the last few years, we have witnessed a remarkable conjuncture between the escalation, acceleration, and diversification of migrant and refugee mobilities into and across the space of “Europe,” on the one hand, and the mutually constitutive crises of “European” borders and “European” identity. Put differently, we have witnessed the autonomy of migrant and refugee movements significantly subvert the borders of Europe, on the one hand, and multiple convulsive reaction formations of re-bordering by the sovereign authorities of the European border regime, on the other.

Notably, this means that the acceleration of cross-border mobilities and the ensuing “crisis” of borders instigated by migrants and refugees have been met with a variety of tactics of (re-)bordering largely dedicated not simply to “exclusion” but, rather more pragmatically, to the coercive deceleration of autonomous human mobilities.

Of course, alongside this larger reaction formation of border fortification and securitization, there has been the resurgence of reanimated reactionary populist nationalisms and racial nativisms, as well as the routinization of antiterrorist securitization measures and a pervasive and entrenched cultural politics of “Islamophobia” (or more precisely, anti-Muslim racism) — all of which contribute to a larger “European” malaise chiefly distinguished by spectacles of “exclusion.”

Nonetheless, the sheer magnitude and momentum of migrant and refugee movements has meant that the sociopolitical space of “Europe” has been convulsed by a postcolonial racial crisis arising from the contradictions of the subjective projects of migrant/refugee non-Europeans and states’ efforts to “manage” their subordinate inclusion.

Exclusion and the Dead

Marina Gržinić, professor at Academy of Fine Arts Vienna and researcher at the Slovenian Academy of Science and Arts (SRC-SASA)

Today the notion of the “subject” in the first capitalist world is reserved only for the citizens (fully acknowledged as such) of the first capitalist neoliberal world. Therefore, the “old” political “subjects” are seen in the form of an archaic subjectivity and delegated to the so-called third world’s capitalisms. The consequences of this are terminal regarding political agency. Or to reformulate this in reference to the most significant shift in the historicisation of capitalism – that is the shift form biocapitalism to necrocapitalism – we see a two-fold mechanism at work. Firstly, if necropolitics represent a new form of governmentality for neoliberal global capitalism as a decision on the administration of death (as opposed to biopolitics being control over life) then we have to ask in which concrete, political, economic and social, ideological situation the sovereign decision over death without impunity is normalised and accepted? Secondly, who are those that are “selected” and targeted as the
goal of this “necro-sovereign” decision?

 

Konst:it choir

•Isadora Del Carmen : conductor, artistic director
•Maj-Lis Wistrand: bass, silence, objects
•Birgitta Åkerström: soprano, balette, objects
•Yvonne Ingelmark: soprano, objects
•Solveig Svensson: vocals, objects

Konst:it wants to bring experimental music into the public domain and disarm the misconception that it is an art for the initiated few by showing how it can be inclusive, accessible and not at all ”difficult”.

Come out to show them
Words phase and blend into a circuit of ever changing pattern. A playful nod to those before us.

… är så stor… så stor
Premiere performance of a dramatical musical poem by composer Hanna Drakengren, with mixed media by field recordist Liis Ring.

Duo-Aphorisms
Inspired by the structural integrity in Bach’s 2-part inventions, composer Nils Henriksson wrote this suite suggesting that a work is recognized through it’s syntactical forms and processes, thus allowing for a plurality of possible sonoric outcome while the essence of the work remains intact.

”…sometimes old people break the rules, especially the rules of conversation and being together. They laugh a lot. I mean real full laughter. Did you ever notice that? They break the rules because, for one reason or another (illness, anger, damage, enough of that, whatever), the rules no longer apply for them. They are alone. Sometimes they are sad. Sometimes they are desperate. Mostly they are brave.” – Robert Ashley

 

Launch of Restad Gård Manifesto

Bilal Almobarak and members of Support Group Network

The Restad Gård Manifesto is the result of a two-day Learning Lab in May 2017 inspired by the self-organising work of the refugees Support Group Network (SGN) from different camps and cities.

It is collectively drafted by members of the refugee Support Group Network (SGN), representatives from Valand Academy, Save the Children Re:Act project, Outgrain, Counterpoints Arts and individuals from a range of arts and educational organisations in Gothenburg and the surrounding regions.

The Restad Gård Manifesto

The Restad Gård Manifesto in Swedish, Arabic, Farsi and Somali

We believe that arts and culture can bring all sections of Swedish society together and make refugee voices and perspectives a central and dynamic part of Swedish civic life.

We believe that arts and culture can serve as a powerful tool for active de-segregation and inclusion.

We believe that arts and culture can ensure that individuals are pro-active whilst waiting for official status and in the vulnerable period of transition into society.

We are committed to ensuring 4 Essential Pillars: Equality, Access, Networking and Sustainability

Equality:

  • We recognise shared humanity and the concept of integration as two-way interaction.
  • We understand integration as a process, which enables people to live well together and as the first step towards inclusion.
  • We are committed to equality in terms of: legal rights, visibility, economic, social, educational, health and cultural recognition.
  • We are committed to providing access to internships, mentoring and other life development opportunities for those waiting or in transition to a new community.

Access:

  • Information: We are committed to providing access to essential information from the first day refugees arrive considering their rights to participate fully in cultural activities, and providing full information of what services are available, e.g. the right to a library card.
  • Transport: We are committed to lobbying for or providing transport to enable participation and access to events.
  • Language: We will use appropriate, accurate and accessible language in written and verbal communications about events and activities. Language learning is to be a high priority in all projects, services etc.
  • Education: Providing opportunities to participate in integrated activities in schools, universities and adult education, as art and culture can play a pivotal role in creating common ground for people to meet, create and share new experiences.
  • Representation/Visibility: Providing access to different cultural, political and public platforms is a tool for changing attitudes towards refugees, talking with them and letting them speak for themselves, and handing over tools to allow them to build their common voice.
  • Funding: We recognise the need for equal access to funding opportunities for self-organized groups like SGN, and arts projects focusing on the waiting and transition periods.

Networking:

  • We will link people up and open organic networking opportunities and platforms for shared interest, recognising educational, cultural and social organisations and programmes can play a key role in providing opportunities and spaces for people to meet across disciplines and social groups.

Sustainability:

  • We recognise the need to re-think how we plan our programmes, with cultural inclusion at their very core, and acknowledge that they will be enriched by welcoming new groups to participate equally. We recognise Support Group Network-SGN as a key resource for working in partnership.