Conference
Wed 13–Fri 15 Nov 2019

Human

Plenary Contributors

  • Barbara Albert
  • Joan Anim-Addo
  • Maaike Bleeker
  • Joanna Bourke
  • Zakiyyah Iman Jackson

The third Biennial PARSE Research Conference (13/14/15 November 2019) at the Faculty of Fine, Applied and Performing Arts at the University of Gothenburg will undertake an interdisciplinary investigation within the arts, humanities and social sciences of the category Human from the multiple perspectives of what it excludes and overlooks.

Politically, culturally and theoretically, it is impossible today to navigate through the dense lattice of emergencies and urgencies without addressing the question of what constitutes the human, inhuman, subhuman and non-human, as well as formulating an adequate response to the anthropocenic threat posed by the human against the planet. As such, the Human conference intends to prompt an interdisciplinary and international debate on key issues of the contemporary global condition.

The six topics

Within the broad and open framework of (artistic) research represented at the PARSE conference it will become possible, in a unique setting of international encounter, to reflect upon burning issues related to the concept of the human. We seek to initiate a dialogue based in the non-separation of theoretical inquiry, artistic practice, arts education, and cultural production, centred around the following themes or “tracks”:

  • the inhuman, the subhuman, the body and inscriptions of the human (the contested universality of the human across the divisions of class, race, gender, trans, queer, ableism, neurodiversity);
  • the imperiled non-human (the Anthropocene, nature, ecological catastrophe) and the technological non-human and objecthood (tools, machine, nature, world of objects, OOO, robotics, algorithms etc);
  • the posthuman, pedagogy and the institution (anti-humanism, anti-anthropocentrism, critique of the humanities, the human produced by the university, knowledge and distinction, disciplines of the human);
  • human mobility and nationhood (transnationalism, cosmopolitanism, migration, human rights, personhood);
  • biopolitics, necropolitics and the governance of the category of the human;
  • decoloniality, post- and neo-colonialism (slavery, indigeneity, empire, desegregation, white Suprematism, white privilege).

These themes are organised to be deliberately transdisciplinary. It is our intention to make the conference operate as a complex dynamic and open meeting point and generator of critique, networks and new multidisciplinary research. We aim to strengthen existing research environments, and to initiate and stimulate research collaborations within the university as well as with international research environments.


Please note there will be a photographer present during the conference. If you would prefer not to be included in this documentation, please let the photographer know on site.

Day 1 - Wednesday13 Nov 2019

12.00-18.00

Registration

Location: Valand: Helma Sanders

14.00-17.00

Doctoral Consortium

Gustav ThaneAssunta RuoccoErik SandelinAndjeas EjikssonJennifer HayashidaEsaias JärnegardMaryam FanniMarcus Lindeen

Location: Valand: Glashuset

Marcus Lindeen
The Staged Documentary

Marcus Lindeen is a director and a doctoral candidate in film and media at Stockholm University of the Arts. His research project is called ”The staged documentary”. Through the completion of a trilogy of films he explores the problems and possibilities of working with documentaries in the studio environment, experimenting with techniques borrowed from theater and fiction filmmaking.

Maryam Fanni
Retro for whom? – The Meaning of 50S Identity for Town Centers in Stockholm Suburbs

In times of entrepreneurial urbanism and financialization, the focus in city management has increasingly shifted from urban planning to aesthetic aspects of places, and the belief in beautification processes to be solutions of social and urban problems has become dominant. Processes of how public spaces and narratives around them are designed in order to attract capital, can be understood through concepts such as sanitization, retail gentrification and city branding. 

This research project focuses on the aestheticization processes of the town centers of Stockholm suburbs Hökarängen, Bagarmossen and Bandhagen. The central study object is a policy manual for signage and shopfront coordination that has been implemented in all three centers, and the study aim to investigate the objectives and methods of the property owners in implementing the invented identity and aesthetics.

Esaias Järnegard
Techniques of Ecstasy

In my presentation I will discuss my project of a score-based music with the tentative title, Techniques of Ecstasy. I will give a brief introduction to the notion of ecstatic techniques and their (possible) use in my music. 

The presentation will use examples of artists and philosophers that realize or touch upon, in  different ways, parts of my project – both in a contemporary perspective and as traces in archaic, ritual cultures. Commonly a search for an immediacy of expression is in centre, where the distance between semantics and semiotics is minimized. 

The final part of the presentation will turn the focus to my practice on sound: a method which seeks to harmonize between a descriptive and prescriptive notation; where body, space and instrument (sound) occupies the only focus of attention.

Andjeas Ejiksson and Jennifer Hayashida
Translating Don Mee Choi

In a collaborative English-to-Swedish translation of the poet and translator Don Mee Choi’s collection Hardly War, we seek to investigate the writing and translation of war experience, history, and memory. The book reflects upon US wars in Asia, including Korea and Viet Nam, and is partially based on a collection of photographs belonging to the author’s father. In this process we are confronted with complex issues related to translation and what it means to re-situate a text into a linguistic and cultural context where the collective memory––and amnesia––at its core is almost completely absent. In this project, how do we implement Choi’s own idea of translation as an ”anti-neocolonial mode”? Furthermore, how do we resist and critically address Swedish liberal notions of justice, vis-á-vis articulations of equity and translatability?

Gustav Thane
Tools to make tools

As a researching blacksmith, I look into the relationship between a human body, materials, and the tools allowing such a relation. A body is never more like a machine than when engaging in a craft, the monotone rhythm of repetition allow efficiency in production.
Internalizing techniques to manipulate a physical material contains an aspect of attunement to that material. This is sometimes described as a negotiation with materials, a material response, or the inner logics of a material. The tools used, do not only shape the materials but together with them also their user. This attunement of a body have been suggested but not elaborated in relation to tools within artistic research.
In my ongoing research, I make blacksmith tools; start with the tools given by nature, my own hands, stones and sticks, and then use the tools to make other tools, use those to make others etc. in four generations. I record the work on video to analyze patterns of movement and compare the different generations and the tools made.
Working with the ambition to produce the same patterns of objects as I have been doing professionally for ten years, using less optimal tools, there is likely to be a tension between my internalized knowing and the work at hand. I might achieve the same results as otherwise, but doing so would demand a slightly adapted pattern of movement and design. My patterns of movement will likely adapt to material circumstances.
Disseminating how my body adapt to evolving material circumstances contribute to the debate of bodily attunement with physical materials and tools.

Assunta Ruocco
Co-working with things

In this talk, which expands on part of my practice based PhD project, I argue that the work of French philosopher of technology Gilbert Simondon can bring a different perspective to our understanding of both artistic and reproductive labour.

Simondon’s concept of psychophysiological alienation designates the alienation that invests both humans and machines, as means towards an end in capitalism. As Marina Vishmidt and Kerstin Stakemaier have observed, ‘since technical and human means alike are limited to their function for capital, and identified as property, their mutual limitation characterises another level of alienation’.

For Simondon the machine is the ‘stranger’, the ‘foreigner’. A stranger within which something human is concealed. But it is possible to get to know this stranger, and escape alienation, through activities of maintenance. Technical activity such as maintenance is distinguished from alienating labour, because it does not only include passive use, but also an intimate knowledge of the machine, a certain ‘coefficient of attention’ to the machine’s technical operation, tuning, improvement.

I will ty to apply Simondon’s ideas on the human-technology relationship to the activities that take places in artists’ studios, workshops, and homes, and reframe maintenance and reproductive labour as undervalued practices of co-working with things.

Erik Sandelin
Ahuman Design

How can designers aptly respond to the ceaseless exploitation of nonhuman animals? Emerging posthuman approaches attempt to disrupt human supremacy through celebrating entanglement with the animal and the vegetal. Abolitionist vegan activists, on the other hand, call for avoiding all interaction with other animals. 

In this presentation I meander towards a designerly ethics of grace, of stepping aside, of severing relations: “I am not so the other may be”. By discussing hands-on explorations of recreational fishing, mock-alien barbecues, and red meat allergy I try to open up for what may ultimately be an undesigning of humans.

17.30-20.00

Exploring the physical: women’s faces and bodies in the frame

Barbara Albert

Location: Valand: Aulan

Moderator: Jyoti Mistry

Spanning a career of over 20 years, Barbara Albert’s films capture the complexity of the human condition through myriad political and historical periods with keen forensic observation. This keynote address attends to the practitioner at work; working with images that offer a series of investigations from her various films. The talk will focus on how ideas are conceptualised through images and the development of ideas across several films. Albert’s focus is on capturing the way in which the practice of film is a context to explore questions of the human condition and will trace the development of a director’s oeuvre over several film works. Excerpts from various works will form part of the keynote address and the evening will end with the screening of a film.

20.00-21.00

Mingle — Hoppet

Location: Valand

Day 2 - Thursday14 Nov 2019

09.00-20.00

Registration

Location: Valand: Helma Sanders

09.00-09.15

Introduction

Sanne Kofod Olsen

Location: Valand: Aulan

09.15-10.15

Chains of Being: Historical Reflections on the Art of Atrocity

Joanna Bourke

Location: Valand: Aulan

Moderator: Jessica Hemmings

War is one of the events that both forges and cements beliefs about who is fully human, partly human, and “bestial”. In this lecture, I explore the role that artists have played on such characterisations, and suggest a new approach to embodied empathy.

10.30-12.30

Parallel tracks

Posthuman, pedagogy and the institution

Location: Valand: Glashuset

Chair: Kristina Hagström-Ståhl

Discussion

The Human in Performance

Annette ArlanderTero NauhaHanna JärvinenPilvi Porkola

This panel is presented by the members of the research project How to do things with performance? In the project we ask what can be done with performance – what actualises when a performance takes place, when it is documented, and when it is written about. Through these epistemological questions, we address the ontology of performance: in what ways can we understand ‘performance’ today, as a new materiality, as presence, and in the international, multilingual context where words, documents, and practices connote differently but are shared in online environments. We seek to update the theory of performativity vis à vis new materialist theories of agential realism and non-philosophy

In this panel we – Tero Nauha, Hanna Järvinen, Pilvi Porkola and Annette Arlander – will focus on the human in performance from four different perspectives, presenting our divergent approaches in four papers or presentations including some demonstrations and video material and then open for a general discussion on the topics.

Tero Nauha will look at human performance from a (non-)philosophical point of view.

Hanna Järvinen will argue for intersectionalism in dance as an alliance of the marginal against the white patriarchies of canon formation, institutional leadership, and media attention.

Pilvi Porkola will contribute to the panel focusing on the interaction with objects, especially tools that artists are working with, like a camera.

Annette Arlander will consider the challenges posed by posthuman performativity (Barad 2003), which suggests that the category of human cannot be taken as given, and by zoe-centred egalitarianism (Braidotti 2017).

For more information about the research project, see https://www.uniarts.fi/en/howtodothingswithperformance

The Inhuman

Location: Valand: Bio Valand

Chair: Sarah Tuck

Screening

Labor and workers’ rights within transnational logistics networks: art as an alternate temporality or collaborative production modality

Benjamin Gerdes

Since the fall of 2018 I have been filming with the Gothenburg local of Hamnarbetarförbundet (in English: the Swedish Dockworkers Union or SDU). The SDU is Sweden’s last significant independent union, proudly member-driven and self-self-consciously militant in their struggle for collective rights. The current project documents member meetings and decision making processes in relationship to the union’s recent strike, and then the broader swedish political debate about new legislation curtailing “the right to strike.” This work is the first chapter of a transnational look at logistics workers in multiple sites (port, warehouse, etc) and seeks to connect the broader questions around commercial transport, data/IT infrastructure.

This screening and lecture addresses a set of aesthetic decisions in relationship to broader questions around art practices within or alongside existing social movements and other struggles. For example, what does it mean to film within a group that is already self-producing its own media (social media, short videos, web archives) without the help of outside media professionals? Or, what are the temporal or serial approaches a politically-engaged film or art project can take in relationship to the acceleration of social media and news cycles? Finally, how can local sites and struggles be contextualized, particularly vis-a-vis Northern Europe and the Global South? In this case, the SDU’s formalized relationship via the International Dockworkers’ Council (IDC) to a transnational network of related labor sites may offer a provisional model. This vector would also address attempts to frame the many failings of EU labor policy, for example the prioritizing of freedom of mobility over workers’ rights, and the position advocated by some for better labor conditions within the EU by defining labor rights as human rights.

Paper

Disentangling the Snarl of Industry: Locating corporate accountability for crimes against humanity and nature

Imani Jacqueline Brown

In the US state of Louisiana, as in extractive zones across the Global South, the fossil fuel industry maintains the spatial, economic, and environmental logic of colonialism and the plantation industry, reifying human and ecological bodies into territorialized financial instruments. After Emancipation, many African American towns developed alongside the sites of their former enslavement as their founders remained bound as sharecroppers. With the discovery of oil at the turn of the 20th century, fossil fuel corporations chose these towns as hosts for some of the nation’s most polluting petrochemical plants.

Louisiana’s fenceline communities are also on the frontline of climate change. Since 1926, oil companies have dredged 10,000 miles of canals to access 75,000 wells throughout Louisiana’s coastal wetlands. Forming a fraying latticework of uncoordinated and largely “orphaned” throughways, these canals usher saltwater from the Gulf into freshwater wetlands, precipitating widespread vegetation death and sediment erosion. Louisiana loses wetlands at one of the fastest rates in the world, and with them a critical buffer from destructive hurricanes and rising seas.

Across the globe, demands for accountability and reparations for colonialism and climate change and the codification of ecological personhood as a counterweight to corporate impunity are expanding horizons for justice. In Louisiana, however, recent lawsuits seeking damages for land loss take a more conservative tack, grounding their claims on non-compliance with state regulations. In so doing, these lawsuits reinforce corporations’ “right” to perpetrate extractive violence provided that said violence complies with myopic regulations set by a corrupt state that prioritizes profit over its human and non-human subjects.

For PARSE, I will make a paralegal case for corporate accountability and the payment of reparations for crimes against humanity and nature in Louisiana, presenting oral and visual testimony.

The inhuman

Location: HDK: stora hörsalen 338

Chair: Jeuno Je Kim

Paper

Objects in the History of Homosexuality

Tom Cubbin

In his seminal essay ’How to Do the History of Male Homosexuality,’ (2002) David Halperin tentatively proposed four pre-homosexual categories of discourse that include effeminacy, pederasty, friendship/love and pederasty/inversion. The emergence of the modern concept of homosexuality has been to downplay gender identities and sexual roles, and to emphasize ‘sameness and mutuality.’ What happens to people whose sexual desires are disrupted by the discourse of homosexuality? How are such ideas negotiated through design processes?

In this presentation I take the example of the bondage straitjacket to explore how we might use design objects to think about history of homosexuality. Jim Stewart was the owner of the store Fetters, which opened in London in 1976 as the first store in the UK devoted to erotic bondage. A lifelong fan of Houdini who trained in the theatre, Stewart was a virtuoso maker who produced straitjacket and sleepsacks as part of his range of products for the euphemistically named ‘restrictive practices.’ Starting out as an enthusiastic amateur who developed a business that spanned Europe and North America, Stewart was frequently in touch with individuals who engaged in all-male bondage scenarios – yet were hesitant about the idea of homosexuality. Based on interviews with collectors, Stewart’s correspondence and writings, and an investigation of the objects themselves – I will examine what the development of the straitjacket can tell us about the borders of homosexuality in the late twentieth century.

Paper

Beyond homo performans: Expanding the subject of Performance Studies

Julie Valentin Dind

This paper looks at Victor Turner’s notion of the human as homo performans in relationship to current debates about the border of the human within the fields of performance studies and disability studies.

Using the work of Fernand Deligny, notably his distinction between “the human” and “the-human-that-we-are,” as well as theories on neurodiversity, this paper argues for the necessity for performance studies to expand its definition of the human and to question the rigidity of the border between human performance and animal performance. This paper examines the way in which neurodiversity complicates the usual understanding of the category of “the human,” by putting into question the universality of language, expression and reflexivity, and the implications it has for the field of performance studies.

In so doing, this paper advances current discussions about the human in performance studies, by demonstrating the necessity to decenter the category of the human as the core subject of performance studies. It argues for the necessity for the field to be attentive to other modes of being and performing, beyond homo performans.

12.30-13.30

Lunch — Resurs Restaurangen

Location: Valand: Workshop Space

13.30-15.00

Parallel tracks

Location: Valand Entrance

Decoloniality

Location: Valand: Bio Valand

Chair: Jessica Hemmings

Performance lecture

The transhuman in distributed centrality?

Lisa Nell Samuels

In this performance talk I will engage with my recent theory of distributed centrality, by which I mean the ethically-considered equality of all being, place, and event. Distributed centrality arises in the context of (postcolonial) transnational personhood and its fluxing identity forces. It implies a concomitant decommissioning of center-margin thinking and an acceptance of non-totalized knowing.

I’ll discuss distributed centrality within visions and possibilities of the transhuman, which emphasizes the perfusion of humanimality with place, context, and event relations. Political ethics always happens with our breathing bodies negotiating the oxygen – and air pressure – of emplaced identity. What it means to be transhuman within distributed centrality includes the important right to be transplace, an identity position that demurs from and negotiates with the efforts in nation-states to fix hierarchies of belonging.

This performance talk will combine creative demonstrations with normative-academic rhetorical inducements.

I can perform this work solo alongside other solo speakers/performers. Alternately, I would be interested in working with 1-2 other people/a panel that wanted to combine forces: to discuss and design a collaborative creative and/or creative-critical performance both framed in advance and then also at least partly spontaneous in the response-generating ambience of the ‘Human’ conference theme.

Accompanying soundwork: Tender Girl. This experimental novel’s central figure is half-shark and half-human, the imagined result of the sex between human and shark in Lautreamont’s 19th century work Les Chant de Maldoror. Girl experientially investigates what it is to be humanimal. I am rendering the novel into audio form this year, and I propose a soundpiece, a chapter that loops continually, playing on a headset available in whatever space the conference sets up for listening. A proposed chapter, ‘Salt,’ is attached.

Screening

Appetite: decolonial feminist love praxis

Nobunye Levin

What if we were to consider appetite as the measure of love. An assertion of love: to be willful in love and be willing to love. But appetite is also about a lack of appetite. It is about what you demand, refuse, insist on, and let go of. The conception of love as appetite produces love as “a series of propositions and objections” (Abbas, 2017) for love itself. Love as political possibility for itself: an erotic move through power (Lorde as cited in Sandoval, 2000:164,5). This is about a refusal of the innocence of love in order to consider it as a “practice of freedom” (hooks, 1994) and as a transformational space (Berlant, 2011) for decolonial feminist love praxis.

To this end, I will exhibit an experimental film that offers a fragmentary cinematic discourse of decolonial feminist love praxis. The film will be framed by a series of performative notes that induct the viewer into the erotic (Lorde, 2007) world of the film.

The film is comprised of a series of fragments that are connected by the activity of willful walking. To be willful is to “will too much, or too little, or in ‘the wrong way’ ” (Ahmed, 2014: 3). The concept of willful walking conceives of walking as an act of desire that becomes willful via the conception of desire as a mobile technology that motivates us to go further; as capable of driving the body and will beyond their limits (Foucault as cited in Sandoval, 2000:164,5). 2000:164,5). A film fragment is an important decolonial tool. It is partial, uncertain and incomplete. Fragments are “outbursts of language” or “the body’s gesture caught in action” (Barthes, 2010:3, 4). They are spontaneous rather than schematic (Barthes, 2010:3-4). Fragments function according to a logic of impulse, change and drift. Fragments are malleable: never “finished” only at “rest”.

The Inhuman

Location: Valand: Glashuset

Chair: Nick Aikens

Paper

Art and Crisis: the Natural and Technological Nonhuman

Rahma Khazam

This paper will explore the ways in which the arts are responding to the current crisis in humanity. While certain artworks highlight the violence humanity perpetrates on nature, others point to the increasing threat the nonhuman – whether objecthood, robots or machines – poses to human subjectivity and individuality. In short, while we imperil the natural nonhuman, the technological nonhuman imperils us.

My focus here will be on a third type of artwork inflected by contemporary philosophy that seeks to resolve this ecological and technological deadlock by flattening its underlying dualities. Take Ursula Biemann’s video Deep Weather, 2013, which looks at the devastation provoked by the highly toxic open pit extraction zone in Alberta, before turning to equally harrowing views of stricken Bangladeshi flood victims building mud embankments in order to try to protect themselves against global warming. For Biemann these images are far more than just denunciations of human violence: they are part of her ongoing crusade against the objectification of natural resources, a crusade that ties in with Félix Guattari’s rejection of the separateness of nature from humans. Another example is Sara Deraedt’s Car Interior series (2009-2011), which consists of photographs of empty car interiors taken from unusual angles, so as to bring to our attention the normally unnoticed qualities of car seats, their shape and fabrics, and encourage us to perceive them for what they are, as strange and disquieting objects entering into contact with their surroundings and each other in ways of which we are unaware. Although thinking about what an objet is ‘feeling’ is an inherently anthropocentric enterprise, the work nonetheless pushes at human-object boundaries. In this paper I will explore these and other artistic/philosophical approaches that strike at the cause of our current predicament, by contesting long-established dualities.

Paper

A River with Standing: Indigenous Rights and Artistic Interventions as the Last Line of Defence Against Ecological Crisis

Mercedes Vicente

What does it mean for a river to have standing? In 2017 the Whanganui River in Aotearoa New Zealand became the first river in the world to be bestowed with personhood rights, in recognition to the local Māori tribe’s kinship to the river, which they see as their ancestor. This alignment of Indigenous and legal realms shifts traditional anthropocentric legislation based on human sovereignty over nature to one assuming a biocentric integration of humans with their environment. This law not only redresses Māori sovereignty and protects the

river, but it identifies a new epistemic order that extends the social contract that had excluded nature, establishing, in Michel Serres’ terms, a ‘natural contract’. The Treaty of Waitangi (1840), the country’s foundational document between Māori tribes and the Crown, plays a pivotal role. Environmentalists are joining in support of Indigenous struggles over land rights and their natural resources as these rights, argues Naomi Klein, represent ‘the last line of defence’ and ‘some of the most robust tools available to prevent the ecological crisis’. The growing political impact of Indigenous activism is key in advocating for a political ecology that recognises the values of social and climate justice and counters, what Madhav Gadgil and Ramachandra Guha term, an ‘environmentalism of affluence’ of the North, contributing to the thinking of ecology from the Global South. Posthuman approaches (Bruno Latour, Tim Morton) in ecological discourses in the arts and humanities tend to depoliticise ecology and ignore non-Western traditions, including Indigenous ones, which were never anthropocentric in the first place. What do Indigenous cosmologies contribute to the current posthuman philosophical debates? What political impact may this unprecedented legal status have on halting extracting industries and preventing ecological crisis? This research maps the philosophical, legal, epistemic and political conditions for, and the impact of Indigenous peoples on, defining a political ecology, through discursive, artistic and activist practices that are ethico-politically responsive and environmentally engaged, and that bear, in T. J. Demos’ words, ‘the potential to both rethink politics and politicize art’s relation to ecology’.

The Right to Design: A purposeful misreading

Location: HDK: Baulan

Chair: Monica Sand

Reading

The Right to Design: A purposeful misreading

Henric BeneschOnkar Kular

The Right to Design is the proposal for a purposeful misreading of Arjun Appadurai’s 2006 paper, The Right to Research, Globalisation, Societies and Education. The ambition is to interrogate how the subject of design can be considered beyond current epistemic, institutional and disciplinary demarcations, not only as a basic human capacity, but as a ‘right’ in itself, which not only challenges those very structures which sorts ‘Design’ from ‘design’, but also raises urgent questions of what it might mean to be (seen & included) and act as human in a fundamentally troubled world.

 

In the introduction to his paper Appadurai states:

 

‘Research is normally seen as a high-end, technical activity, available by training and class background to specialists in education, the sciences and related professional fields. It is rarely seen as a capacity with democratic potential, much less as belonging to the family of rights. In this paper, I will argue that it is worth regarding research as a right, albeit of a special kind. This argument requires us to recognise that research is a specialised name for a generalised capacity, the capacity to make disciplined inquiries into those things we need to know, but do not know yet. All human beings are, in this sense, researchers, since all human beings make decisions that require them to make systematic forays beyond their current knowledge horizons.’

 

The reading begins by straightforwardly replacing ‘research’ with ‘design’ within Appadurai’s text to consider the potential (‘albeit of a special kind’) of extending and stretching Appadurai’s logic of ‘rights to research’ to that of ‘rights to design’. By stretching the logic, the reading attempts to situate the question of ‘Designs’ relationship to human (and non-human) rights and to subsequently use the reading to reconsider, speculate and imagine What is ’and ‘Could be’ the Right to Design?

 

With this in mind the misreading will work with and through concepts such as de-institutionalizing, de-parochialising and de-disciplining with a particular focus on education.

15.00-15.30

Public Enquiries book launch

Kerstin Bergendal

Location: Valand: X-Library

15.30-16.00

Coffee

Location: Valand: Workshop Space

16.00-17.30

Parallel tracks

Human Mobility

Location: Valand: Bio Valand

Chair: Kristina Hagström-Ståhl

Screening

Brand

Jörgen DahlqvistFredrik Haller

The video essay screening will be based on documentary material filmed in the MacAllen, texas, USA, this fall. The material is part of the on-going research for a new production, Brand, with the performing arts collective Teatr Weimar. When premiered in 2020-21, Brand will be the third performing arts production in a trilogy dealing with the societal challenges of migration. The video discusses migration, tourism and identity with experiences made from a boat trip on the Rio Grande. Crossing Rio Grande is one important way for the Mexican migrants to enter the U.S.A – and just as on the mediterranean sea, families have died trying to get in to the US. Also, in McAllen is one of the biggest detention centers for Mexican refugees.  On the river American tourists can get a guided tour of the river to learn more of the Mexican side, the US-patrol towers. Based on this boat ride, a poetic reflection is made on migration and tourism and with on the US president’s suggesting to enhance the wall with spikes and alligators to guard the US border.

Paper

Human Vulnerability at the EU Border

Evangelia Papada

This paper discusses the notion of human vulnerability as a philosophical, legal and geographical concept. In recent years, border crossings have become sites where people are exposed to various forms of precarity and violence, including hunger, long waiting, detention, even death. This puts border crossers in situations of vulnerability and accentuates previous vulnerabilities they may have carried during their journey.

Current philosophical debates on vulnerability aim to disengage the notion from its direct link to violence. These theories advocate a view on vulnerability that celebrates our common humanity and becomes a platform for political demands on account of our shared human vulnerability. At the same time, events unfolding in the borderlands around the world, point to a renewed state of forced precariousness for non-citizens. Given the difficulties in making shared political demands when faced with the citizen- non citizen divide, the project of advancing human vulnerability for emancipatory politics requires careful consideration.

In my current study, I look at the role played by the legal conceptualisation of vulnerability in mediating between people’s rights to seek asylum and the states responsibility to protect borders. How does a legally understood notion of vulnerability affect the lives of those crossing EU’s borders? What are some of the pitfalls in applying the notion of human vulnerability in the management of international populations? This contribution aims to explore some of these questions.

The Inhuman

Location: Valand: Glashuset

Chair: Annelies Vaneycken

Workshop

Exploring Alternative Applications of Autotheory

James DuffyGloria López-CleriesKolbrún Inga Söring

For the 2019 PARSE Biennial Conference: HUMAN, we proposed a participatory workshop resulting in an open ended publishing which will be presented during the conference. We are an inquiry group in the context of the MFA at Valand, exploring the formation of the other. This led to discussions about how social groups form and how power structures within society form the way we look at ourselves and others. We began looking at the work of Paul Preciado and specifically the utilisation of Autotheory. The term Autotheory is applied to the method of analysing personal experience within political contexts and how the self is constructed through available epistemologies of our current socio-political climates. The 2019 conference theme offers a platform to discuss Autotheory both in relation to Biopolitics as well as ‘the contested universality of the human across the divisions’. We want participants to realise the use of Autotheory as a method of practice, to record and to see its capabilities in text and non-text-based disciplines when discussing self in relation to the governance of the category of the human.

It will be an opportunity to introduce Autotheory, it’s problematics and potentialities. With this knowledge, the workshop engaged with texts such as Donna Harraway’s Situated Knowledgesand Maggie Nelson’s Argonauts to name a few. Participants were then invited to use Autotheory as a tool to explore their personal histories, using it in an expanded and explorative form.

Through an Open Call we invited students from different faculties of GU, researchers and other cultural agents to participate in the workshop. During the workshops, which took place on four occasions, the group developed a critical engagement with various academic artefacts such as the publication, taking the decision of making instead an open ended publishing. Throughout the workshop we decided to apply the method of Autotheory to all stages of the project, resulting in a performative presentation with the whole group, inviting conference attendees to participate in our processes.

17.45-18.45

Suspended Munition: Mereology, Morphology, and the Mammary Biopolitics of Transmission 

Zakiyyah Iman Jackson

Location: Valand: Aulan

Moderator: Sanne Kofod Olsen

I will think with Simone Leigh’s Trophallaxis and the artist’s stated interest in “black women as a kind of material culture” and career-spanning meditation on black women as containers of knowledge and trauma. I place Trophallaxis in conversation with Alison Saar’s “Mammy Machine,” Hortense Spillers’s landmark Diacritics essay “Mama’s Baby, Papa’s Maybe: An American Grammar Book,” and Toni Morrison’s Beloved. Thinking across the scale of the cell, the breast, and embattled human sociality, this essay shifts black feminist critical attention from the posterior to the breast and suggests thinking sociogenically troubles utopic interpretations of trophallaxis in the biological sciences and beyond.

19.00

Dinner — Container Kitchen

Location: Valand

Day 3 - Friday15 Nov 2019

09.00-11.00

Registration

Location: Valand: Helma Sanders

09.00-09.15

Introduction

Location: Valand: Aulan

09.15-10.15

With strips from the full moon” and other “ways of knowing”: (Re)presentations of the “new” human

Joan Anim-Addo

Location: Valand: Aulan

Moderator: Nils Olsson

Drawing centrally on Sylvia Wynter’s theorising concerning the “overrepresentation of Man”, I return to the figure of the “new” human, suggested in my earlier essay, “Towards a post-western humanism made to the measure of those recently recognised as human” (2008). I consider “ways of knowing” through which the “new” human – grudgingly recognised as such only following the Abolition of Atlantic slavery and the financial compensation of their erstwhile masters – has begun the contemporaneous project of (re)presenting the self within a necessarily intercultural and transcontinental modernity. Reading texts by Caribbean writers Erna Brodber, Dionne Brand, Lorna Goodison and Jacob Ross, little known in European classrooms, I consider what such writing might contribute to our Humanities debate, particularly regarding Literary Studies within which Black scholarship and scholars are woefully and significantly underrepresented. I interrogate the place of violence that once sustained the historical degradations and inequalities in the project of overrepresentation, and currently underpins the contemporary underrepresentation within spaces of knowledge production. I attempt to disentangle the liberatory, affective and transcultural in this particularised speaking to the “genres of the human” (Wynter) that Racism and colonialism determined to erase, by exterminating so many human cultures related to the “new” human.

10.30-12.00

Parallel tracks

GIBCA Session

Location: Valand: Aulan

Chair: Daniel Jewesbury

Paper

Interventionist Internet Art and The Aesthetics of Information Ethics

Paolo Cirio

Paolo Cirio examines the ethics and aesthetics of working with online piracy, data breach, identity theft, privacy, fake news, algorithms, and hacking. Cirio explores boundaries, responsibilities, and the consequences of reconfiguring social dynamics for artistic and social agendas. His artworks are often active agents – they elicit reactions from the subjects of the works and participation from the audience. The interactions and processes from his interventions generate online performances. These socially engaged art involve the public in critical debates for change driven directly by his artistic concepts and creations, which often embody personal risks and challenges. Cirio has often been subject to investigations, legal and personal threats by governmental and military authorities, powerful multinationals, global banks and law firms, as well as online crowds of ordinary people. For instance, his artworks have unsettled institutions such as Facebook, Amazon, Google, VISA, Pearson, Cayman Islands, and NATO, among others. The ethical and social relations created by these artworks produce aesthetic forms, which concerns the field of the aesthetics of ethics, while they address the ethics of global finance, politics, and information technology.

Paper

Anubumin

Oliver Ressler

Oliver Ressler will discuss the film “Anubumin”, carried out in collaboration with Zanny Begg in 2017. The film focuses on Nauru, a tiny remote island in the Pacific with 10,000 inhabitants. The narration discusses different voids that have shaped the islands past and future. The largest void is a physical one, the island is a raised reef consisting of calcite and phosphate on a volcanic base, which since 1906 has been mined and exported to Australia, to fertilise the former colonisers’ farms. When phosphate extraction came to a stop in the 1980s, Nauru was bankrupt and 80 percent of the land area uninhabitable and infertile. In an attempt to generate income, in the 1990s Nauru became a prime money-laundering haven. After the disappearance of soil and money, today Nauru involves in the “disappearance of people” – housing one of Australia’s offshore refugee detention centres.


In a reaction to the criticism on terrible human right situation in the detention centre, Nauru severely restricted access to the island. Four whistleblowers, who worked as doctors and nurses in the detention centre, describe the institutionalised human rights violations in the offshore detention. Today a new void threatens the island, rising sea-levels threaten the coastal edge, which is the only area left for its inhabitants to live.

 

The Inhuman

Location: Valand: Glashuset

Chair: Thomas Laurien

Paper

From anthropocentrism to microecologism. Reading the film Bullhead.

Amelie Björck

Western traditions of arts and humanities are built on anthropocentrism. This means that certain knowledges are still being subjugated, since our narrative formats and hermeneutic skills remain to be fixated on the human figure and scale. As a literary scholar I am interested in exploring ways of reading and understanding that may widen the scope.

In order to open up this problematic I will analyse Belgian filmmaker Michaël Roskam’s film Bullhead from 2011. In interesting ways this story about a farmer and his cattle, caught up in a meat mafia scandal, exposes what Jacques Derrida has labelled “carnophallogocentrism”, a system of multiple hierarchical intersections. The film is representative of humanist traditions in the way it focuses on the tragic drama of a human male, but it also takes some interest in the fate of the animals, by way of hinting a shared falling between man and animal via techniques of analogy, mirroring etcetera.

However, there is a third drama going on: a drama on the micro level where the abuse of antibiotics in the (mafia controlled) animal industry is threatening to harm the fragile balance of global microecologies. This is a drama that lacks full articulation within the narrative format of the production.

I will present three readings of the film – a traditional anthropocentric-psychological reading, an animal studies reading and a posthumanist microecological reading – in order, firstly, to make conscious our normative focus on mammal scaled drama, and, secondly, to point out the need for a reorientation of our attention to other scales, both in art making and in reading.

Paper

Design for the More-than-Human World: creating biocement structures for oyster restoration

Ryan Michael Hoover

Here we explore the possibility of a design practice that breaks from extractive anthropocentric perspectives in favor of interspecies collaborations that seek to restore ecological systems by advanced biofabrication technologies and sympathetic processes of making. The crisis of the Anthropocene is directly traceable to the extractive relationship to the planet established through colonialism and accelerated by Modernist technological and economic forces. The results of this approach is evident in Chesapeake Bay in the eastern United States, a thriving ecosystem when colonists arrived. Oysters served as a keystone species that provided habitat in their reefs and could filter all 75,000 km3 of water in the bay in only three days. Now decimated to less than 1% of this population by overharvesting, pollution, and disease, the species cannot recover due to a lack of substrate for the oyster larvae to settle upon and rebuild these missing reefs. Restoration efforts that replace the extracted shell, seeded by scientists with lab-cultured larvae show promise but are severely limited by the lack of available shell. Efforts that use alternative substrates like concrete have competing negative environmental impacts or other shortcomings. Through a collaboration between researchers and students at the Maryland Institute College of Art, scientists at University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, the soils bacteria S. pasteurii, and the oyster C. virginica, we explore the possibility of creating biocement structures that can provide habitat for oyster restoration. In this process we explore altrnative design intentionalities, new technologies of making, and more a sympathetic relationship to living with this planet and our many cohabitants.

Paper

Premonitions of the Catastrophe

Neil Chapman

In his book The Dust of This Planet (2011) Eugene Thacker proposes that our slowness to take seriously the threat of climate catastrophe is the result of an inability to conceptualise the scale of the changes to come. Humanity is conditioned to see the world as resource for exploitation. In order to address the urgent problem, he says, we need new perspectives, a substitution of the ‘world-for-us’ with a perspective he calls ‘the world-in-itself’. But that vantage point, with its shades of Gaia theory, is only one step towards the more profound correction as we imagine a ‘world-without-us’. There are difficulties. To think the world-without-us is paradoxical in that it requires the projection of a human presence into that future, at least, that’s the case if thought itself is necessarily human. But what if, on the contrary, the thoughts we habitually assume belong to us are not ours at all? What if, just as our bodies are comprised of other beings (bacteria, fungi, etc.) our thoughts are non-human in a comparable way? Then to imagine the world-without-us may not be the logical impossibility it first appears. Thacker develops his interest in cinematic and literary narratives of the post-apocalypse. But certain currents in recent and contemporary art seem to reveal knowledge of symbiosis in the life of the mind too. As these innovations and their histories are brought to the fore, we can begin to understand the philosophical point in a new way. This paper identifies techniques designed by artists to inhibit the over-coding of thought with an all-too-human perspective. Such works may be repellent, difficult to read, but, increasingly, they can be seen as vital proto-work towards the intra-species philosophy that Thacker and others are proposing, and that is needed if humanity is to awaken to its difficult future.

12.00-13.00

Lunch — Resurs Restaurangen

Location: Valand: Workshop Space

13.00-14.00

The Mise en Scène of Posthuman Thinking

Maaike Bleeker

Location: Valand: Aulan

Moderator: Kristina Hagström-Ståhl

My presentation will approach the subject of ‘the human’ today from the perspective of what media theorist Mark Hansen (2015) describes as human implicatedness. Hansen introduces this term in the context of his discussion of current technological developments that confront us with a situation in which technology can no longer be understood as a set of tools used by humans, and instead has become an ecology in which humans participate. The fact that humans operate as part of larger ecologies, and that their agency and sense of self is intimately intertwined with the affordances of these ecologies, is of course not new, nor is it unique to today, or to technology. As theorists of posthumanism have pointed out, this condition has merely been obscured by a history of human-centered thinking. The current state of technological developments foregrounds the condition of human implicatedness and intensifies it. This situation, Hansen argues, requires that humans develop better awareness of their modes of being, doing, perceiving and thinking, as well as their sense of self and of agency, as being implicated within larger apparatuses.

I will explore various aspects of human implicatedness in dialogue with works by contemporary artists using staging (mise en scène) as a means to address this condition and to rehearse ways of engaging with it. The work of these artists (including Julian Hetzel, Stefan Kaegi/Rimini Protocoll, Manuela Infante, Kris Verdonck, Dries Verhoeven and Erik Joris) is often presented in the context of theatre and performance. I am using ‘staging’ rather than ‘theatre’ or ‘performance’ to describe their work because rather than showing or telling stories by means of theatrical performance, they use staging as a means to create arrangements in time and space that implicate spectators in larger apparatuses and engage them in modes of looking, associating, and making sense. Their work is thus not only about aspects of human implicatedness but also explores the potential of staging as a posthuman approach to thinking as a material practice in which human modes of making sense and thinking are implicated within larger apparatuses. Their work, I will argue, demonstrates the potential of the theatrical apparatus as what I propose to term a thought apparatus engaging audiences in a thinking that happens in the world rather than in the head of the autonomous human subject, and in interaction with larger material apparatuses in which humans participate. This understanding of staging as thought apparatus takes its inspiration from on the one hand the idea of the thought-image as promoted by Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno and other European writers in the 1930s and 1940s and, on the other hand, a non-representational understanding of thinking as creative practice of confronting chaos by making connections, grasping relations, and composing form as proposed by Deleuze and Guattari in their What is Philosophy?

14.15-15.45

Parallel Tracks

The Inhuman

Location: Valand: Glashuset

Chair: Mariangela Mendez Prencke

Panel

Alterworldings from Latin America: Hybrid Bodies, Absent Bodies, Things that Matter, and the Praxis of Ecocriticism

Gianfranco SelgasEugenia ArriaAnalía Ferreyra Carreres

Throughout the last decades, the concept of the Anthropocene has gained currency in different academic and artistic disciplines, leading to an alternative focus on the exploration of the complex links between the human and the nonhuman. In this panel, we propose a Latin American approach to these complexities, diving into cultural expressions dealing with the region’s emergencies and urgencies in relation to the contemporary global condition. As a region, Latin America offers a long and rich cultural tradition to explore, among other things, the limits of bodies, gender and matter, the intersections of nature and culture, and the contested universality of the human across naturecultures. This more-than-human stand, traditionally associated to indigenous knowledges and cultures in the Americas, has gained importance among contemporary authors and artists interested in challenging both aesthetically and politically speaking the fixed narratives of modern epistemologies. Drawing from this context, our presentations will theorize contemporary aesthetic works produced in the region dealing with fictional human and nonhuman interactions, while contesting the universality of the humanist and (neo)liberal project of modernity. Based on an ecocritical, ecological, feminist, new materialist, and postcolonial standpoint, we will make use of inter/transdisciplinary critical, creative and affirmative methods to inspire alterworldings in order to move beyond traditional, hermeneutic-grounded criticism. More specifically, we will both theorize and embody the participatory aesthetics of contemporary Latin American verbal and visual arts following a post-anthropocentric approach. Our aim is to discuss the potential of Latin America as a peripheral space to rethink, speculate, and affectively engage with the ontologically diverse material actants of the world.

Imperiled Non-Human

Location: HSM: A302 (Lindgrensalen)

Chair: Andjeas Ejiksson

Performance - 14:30

Barbara: A Tale of Transformation

Garðar Eyjólfsson

Barbara is a near-future design-fiction project. It tells the story of Barbara, who has genetically manipulated his/her/its own body to grow textiles, in order to bypass traditional modes of production. On a geopolitical scale the project addresses the effects of the textile industry on our environment and ecology. It also enters cultural and identity politics, as well as ideas about becoming more synthetic, digital or intangible. It questions the belief in the redemption of technology and progress and the narratives of the Anthropocene. It explores the concept of nature and the much emphasised need to reconnect with nature. It explores bio-technology and genetics, where our own bodies, forms and manifestations are being questioned and pushed. In this sense, it thematises biopolitics; the human body as an entity subject to various systems of control. Furthermore, it asks how a big shift in technology and behaviour could potentially alter our world view. And how this reality would look like? What effect would it have on different elements? Fashion, barbershops, environment, sexuality, music, love, relationships between „normal“ and „hybrids“ et cetera. Barbara is a tale of transformation, an attempt to explore future realities related to the conflicting narratives of ‘human/non-human’, ‘nature/non-nature’ and ‘technology’, rendering narratives or future realities as a means to critically think, engage and ask questions about contemporary conflicts. As such it aligns with Anthony Dunne’s and Fiona Raby’s notions of speculative design (Speculative Everything, 2013). Barbara would like to perform a musical event for the Human Conference in Gothenburg. A multi-media performance using green screen, costumes, artefacts and music.

The Inhuman

Location: HSM: A304-5

Chair: Jyoti Mistry

Performance - 15:20

SQUIRM :: fleshy cartoons in dialogue with the not yet and the already dead

Stacey Sacks

An assembly of idiotic and impulsive bodies, this performed essay happens at the intersections of Whiteness, privilege and colonial history. Drawing on Stacy Alaimo’s notion of ‘porous bodies and trans-corporeality’ and working with queer aesthetics of uncertainty and failure, this encounter excavates haunting intersections of history through a series of corporeal, material and technological experiments.

Working from within a space that perceives identity as transversal, contingent, complex, emergent and larger than our human bodies, this essay is an attempt to playfully open up to modes of engagement that notice our complicity, trace our entanglements and stir the necessary discomfort emerging from facing these complexities.

By exploring the significance of material forces and their interface with human bodies, the essay wonders what it means for notions of embodiment to develop post-humanist sensibilities that destabilize the human figure.

SQUIRM: fleshy cartoons in dialogue with the already and not yet dead  is a fragment of Stacey Sacks’ doctoral artistic research project in Performing Arts (Acting Dept) at the Stockholm University of the Arts. The project is currently titled ‘This Untethered Buffoon or The Trickster in Everything’. Via hyper-disciplinary experiments of the impulse and what it means to be ‘on’ the moment, the project is an ontology of character and impulse from within this performer’s experience, staking a claim for situatedness and the on-goingness of uncertainty, especially given current global geo-political crises. The research explores haunting intersections of history whilst performing, animating and satirising questions of W(w)hiteness, privilege and colonial logic. As experimentation with productive discomfort, it digs through remnants of collective memory, personal genealogy and shame in the hope of reassembling new ways of giving attention.

Performance - 16:10

On ‘signalling at a molecular level’ - reverberations of interference

Monika Jaeckel

For the PARSE Human conference, we —myself with participating dancers Giulia Iurza and Gloria Trolla— will present and speak on the recent performance ‘signalling – at the molecular level’ delivered on March 2019 at Ambika P3 Gallery Space, London. The project, whose thematic outline I conceived and then was collaboratively realized in each performance version, brought together knowledges on different levels: visualising the positionality in space by a grid; e-textile objects that amplify electromagnetic waves; and movement knowledge by the dancers and all other participants who intra-actively enhance existing interference patterns.

In its full version, this movement piece is accompanied by a short text of performative writing speculating on the sustainability of the self-claimed central position of the human. Relying on neglected forms of knowledge production, as here considered movement, to foster an understanding of human thinking as inter-active process. This builds on Karen Barad’s understanding which settles on the possibilities of mutual response including matter. Agency then is not something that is solely possessed by humans, but an enactment of intra-active renderings, which always comprise possibilities for re-configurings. In this sense human situatedness is explored through the responses around, which occur due to intra-active engagements with other matter that implicate, whether neglected or not, calls for response-ability.

During the performance, the visible and audible specifics of the site become experiential through the diffraction of words and movement, intellect and sense, into contiguity. Throughout the piece, movement practitioners engage with the space, and each other. In their learning from and becoming with e-textiles pieces by the designer Gabriela Guasti Rocha, a normally imperceptible acoustic layer is brought forward. Fitted with wireless transmitters, these e-textiles pick up buzzing sounds from electromagnetic waves whose interference patterns are enhanced by motion. The combination of these noises sparked by movement, together with my spoken text, aims to underscore that thought and action emerge as diffractive interferences with the surroundings. The unanticipated, simultaneous surfacing of various forms of knowing (in moving, speaking, listening) addresses motion as multi-layered. This processual interweaving levels that which is commonly understood as antagonistic – theory and practice, body and mind, self and other – towards an interpretation of complementarity.

The performance has been developed within the frame of my (PhD) research project, under the title ‘moved by being moved to moving’ approaches common patterns of binary thought as body-mind distinctions by conceptualizing movement as its practice and method. Motion is approached as a sometimes neglected or not fully recognized form of coming to know. Yet, as all interlacing of knowledges of different and interfering sources intertwines on its basis, motion has to be considered as always involved. Contrary to regarding moving as a solely voluntary act, humans are also always part of being moved – to moving. Movement, i.e. physicality, is understood as co-constitutional conception rather than as binary and juxtaposing to rationale, i.e. intellect.

Decoloniality

Location: HDK: Baulan

Chair: Ram Krishna Ranjan

Workshop

A collective reading of the book, Samba Shiva: The Photographs of Sambasiva Rao Patchineelam

Vijai Maia Patchineelam

I propose a reading of the book “Samba Shiva”, which is mediated through the excess material generated while making the book, such as contracts, proof copies, color proofs, dummies to ensure structural quality, artifacts such as the original Olivetti Valentine typewriter pictured in the book and other reference material related to the project.

Published by Zum and Instituto Moreira Salles, São Paulo, the book “Samba Shiva” is an artist initiated editorial project, edited by myself, an artist and son of Sambasiva. In “Samba Shiva,” I revisit the photographic archive of my father, a scientist who immigrated to Brazil at the end of the 70’s. Sambasiva graduated in geology in India, received his masters in Austria and a PhD in Germany before arriving in Salvador to teach at the Federal University of Bahia. In the late 60’s, he received a Minolta camera as gift from a friend and since then, he has registered family moments in Brazil and India, as well as his professional activities and research trips. The book grapples with issues such as Indian diaspora, of a particular period coined as the “brain drain”, post-colonial issues dealing with photography in India, such as the scarcity of amateur photography during the British rule, later by independent India.

During the reading, questions regarding the displacement of traditional roles will be raised, concerning the artist turned editor, scientist turned amateur photographer and now author published by a well regarded Brazilian institution. Instituto Moreira Salles is known internationally for their work in photography, through publications and exhibitions of photographers such as Robert Frank, William Eggleston, Claudia Andujar, Seydou Keita, among others. Considering the perspective of each actor, taking in to account the consequences caused by this particular configuration and how this conceptual strategy that plays with institutional framing and its power over who’s represented has informed the development of the book.

15.45-16.15

Coffee

Location: Valand: Workshop Space

16.15-17.45

Parallel Tracks

18.00-20.00

Dinner — Hoppet

Location: Valand: Workshop Space

Installations

18.00-20.00

Minute/Year

O’Doherty & Kovacs

18.00-20.00

The Computer as seen at the end of the human age

Olle EssvikLars Kristensen

18.00-20.00

The transhuman in distributed centrality

Lisa Nell Samuels

Practical Information

The 3rd PARSE biennial research conference takes place in the three campuses of the Faculty of the Arts at Gothenburg University. Valand Academy of Art, HDK the School of Design and Crafts, and HSM the Academy of Music and Drama.

Gothenburg offers excellent connections and public transport in and around the city.

FROM GOTHENBURG LANDVETTER AIRPORT

Take the transfer bus “flygbuss” https://www.flygbussarna.se/en to “Kungsportsplatsen” or “Berzeligatan”

(Gothenburg centre) – they run every ten minutes and travel takes approximately 30 minutes.

FROM GOTHENBURG MAIN TRAIN STATION

Take tram 2, 3, 4, 7 to the Valand tram stop. We recommend downloading the Västraffik app for up- to- date travel information and advice. https://www.vasttrafik.se/en/tickets/more-about-tickets/vasttrafik-to-go/

CONFERENCE VENUES ARE

VALAND ACADEMY, Vasagatan 50, 411 37 Göteborg

HDK (School of Design and Crafts)  Kristinelundsgatan 6-8

HSM (Academy of Music and Drama), Fågelsången 1, 412 56 Göteborg

Accommodation

We have arranged pre-booking agreements with a selection of hotels in the centre of Gothenburg, all within walking distance to the conference venues. Further details can be found through the Meet again registration page

Contact

For any further questions regarding the 3rd biennial PARSE conference 2019, please contact the conference co-ordinator Rose Borthwick:
parse@konst.gu.se

Conference Committee

Chair:

Dean at the Faculty of Fine, Applied and Performing Arts — Sanne Kofod Olsen

Working Group:

Professor Dave Beech — Valand Academy

Professor Erling Björgvinsson — HDK

Rose Borthwick — Valand Academy

Professor Kristina Hagström Ståhl —HSM

Professor Jyoti Mistry — Valand Academy

Professor Jessica Hemmings — HDK

Lucy Wilson — Valand Academy

Contributors

A

Barbara Albert

Barbara Albert studied directing and screenwriting at the Vienna Film Academy.  After introducing her  short  films  at  several  festivals,  her  first  feature film NORDRAND was internationally acclaimed at its screening in the competition of Venice International Film Festival in 1999.  In the same year Barbara Albert founded the production company coop99, together with Martin Gschlacht, Jessica Hausner and Antonin Svoboda. She worked as producer on GRBAVICA, DARWIN’S NIGHTMARE, SLEEPER and LOVELY RITA. As a writer she has worked with the writer / directors Jasmila Zbanic, Andrea Staka, Ruth Mader and Michael Glawogger. After FREE  RADICALS,  FALLING  and  THE DEAD  AND  THE  LIVING,  which  premiered  in the competitions of San Sebastian, Venice and Locarno, MADEMOISELLE PARADIS is Barbara  Albert’s  fifth feature  film.  Her films have received numerous  awards.  She is professor at the Film University Babelsberg “Konrad  Wolf”  in  Potsdam and has been living in Berlin since 2010.

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Joan Anim-Addo

Joan Anim-Addo is a Professor of Caribbean Literature and Culture at Goldsmiths, University of London. She is Director of the Centre for Caribbean and Diaspora Studies. Her publications include the libretto, Imoinda, the poetry collections: Haunted by History, and Janie Cricketing Lady; as well as the literary history, Touching the Body: History, Language and African-Caribbean Women’s Writing.

In 2016 she was honoured with a Lifetime Achievement Award for “invaluable contributions to literature and to literary and cultural studies” by the leading US literary quarterly journal, Callaloo.

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Annette Arlander

Annette Arlander is an artist, researcher and a pedagogue, one of the pioneers of Finnish performance art and a trailblazer of artistic research. At present she is Visiting Professor at Stockholm University of the Arts. Educated as a theatre director (1981), with an MA from Helsinki University and a DA from Theatre Academy, Helsinki (1999), she was Professor of Performance Art and Theory 2001-2013, creating the MA programme in Live Art and Performance Studies, the first Head of the Performing Arts Research Centre (Tutke) 2007-2009, and Professor of Artistic Research 2015-2016 at the Theatre Academy Helsinki. Her research interests include artistic research, performance-as-research, site-specificity and the environment. Her artwork involves performing landscape by means of video or recorded voice, moving between performance art, video and environmental art.

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Eugenia Arria

Eugenia Arria (Maracay, 1993) is currently a PhD candidate in Spanish at Lund University, Sweden. She holds a BA in Humanities and Arts from the Carlos III University of Madrid, Spain, and a MA in Spanish and Latin-American Studies from the University of Bergen. She is currently working on her research project namedTowards a Theory of Architectural Violence: A Study on the Wounding Houses of Current Venezuelan Literature (2010- )”, where she intends to understand the intertwined relationships between architecture, matter, violence and subjectivation through literary texts. She is also interested in writing poems and short stories, and for several years she has been an active member of the Maracay’s Culture House poetry group in her home country, Venezuela. Whilst carrying out her doctoral project, she is also working on two books of poems: El jardín profundo andEcos de Bergen.

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B

Henric Benesch

Henric Benesch is an associate professor (docent) in Design at HDK-Valand – Academy of Art and Design, acting Dean at The Artistic Faculty and an associate of Centre for Critical Heritage Studies (CCHS) at the University of Gothenburg. He is an architect interested in transdisciplinary and intersectional aspects of knowledge creation within and in relation to education and built environment with a particular interest in site-based and speculative methodologies. Recent publications include “The Right to Design” (2020), “What if a 1%-rule for Public Design” (2021) and “Co-curating the city: universities and urban heritage past and future” (2022).

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Kerstin Bergendal

Born in Gothenburg in 1957, living in Copenhagen since1984 and graduated from the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in 1992.

Kerstin is recognized as a pioneer and prominent practitioner of a particular subdivision of site-specific contemporary art, called time-based participatory intervention. This practice implies that the artist maps out and affects the world around by formulating, poising and revising a process of questioning. With such inquiries Kerstin creates and develops relationships and collaboration between others – local people alongside professional groups and representatives. As she maintains these relationships durationally, Kerstin is enabled to produce a joint action force within each site that can enable real change. Through imagining possible common change, this practice targets a realized utopia. In her work, Kerstin rethinks and challenges the historic “license” that has traditionally given artists the right to work autonomously – understood as self-oriented, utopian and without direct applicability or determined usage. For almost thirty years, she has studied, expanded and turned the particular operational space of art inside out. Along the way, she has formed an artistic toolbox that is counter to that of the ‘autonomous artist’: one that opens to elicit, address and inform the underlying structures that always characterize any place and any context.

Kerstin’s projects include Trekroner Art Plan Project (Roskilde DK 2001-2011) including the Overview – the story of a city that is not yet (Museum of Contemporary Art Roskilde DK 2003), Toying with Brochmanns Place (KOES museum of Art in Public Domain, Koege DK 2005), Twenty Days in Viborg – a Journey (Viborg Kunsthal 2, DK 2011) PARK LEK (Marabouparken Konsthall Sundbyberg SE 2010-2014), A NOW-TIME ZONE (Bristol City 2018) and PONTON (Stockholm Konst 2017.

She  currently realises Aproposeneng /Concerning a Meadow, which will be performed and published in a gradually updated homepage: www.aproposeneng.dk. (Copenhagen City DK 2019-2021).

Kerstin Bergendal teaches and conducts research at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

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Amelie Björck

Amelie Björck is a senior lecturer of Comparative Literature and Drama at Södertörn University, Sweden. Her previous animal studies research has concerned apes and monkeys in Northern European literature after Darwin. Her most recent project focused on narrative temporality (linear/queer) as decisive for the life and agency of farmed animals in different forms of literature and art. The book Zooësis. Om kulturella gestaltningar av lantbruksdjurens tid och liv was published by Glänta Produktion in 2019 (transl. Upcoming). In 2018 Björck co-founded the Ratatǫskr Research Group for Literary Animal Studies at Södertörn University.

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Maaike Bleeker

Maaike Bleeker is a professor of Theatre, Dance and Performance at Utrecht University. She received her training in Art History, Philosophy and Theatre Studies from the University of Amsterdam, where she also obtained her PhD from the Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis (ASCA). Bleeker’s research focuses on processes of perception and meaning making in performance, dance, theatre and the arts, as well as in science and in public life. She combines approaches from the arts and performance with insights from philosophy, media theory and cognitive science. She is partner in the project Performative Body Mapping (funded by the Australian Research Council) and project leader of Acting Like a Robot: Theatre as Testbed for the Robot Revolution (funded by the Dutch Organization for Scientific Research, NWO). She served as President of Performance Studies international (PSi), 2011-16. Her monograph Visuality in the Theatre was published by Palgrave (2008). She (co) edited several volumes including Anatomy Live. Performance and the Operating Theatre (2008) Performance & Phenomenology. (Routledge 2015), Transmission in Motion. The Technologizing of Dance (Routledge, 2016) and Thinking Through Theatre and Performance (Bloomsbury 2019).

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Joanna Bourke

Professor of History in the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck, University of London. She is a Fellow of the British Academy.

She is the Principal Investigator for an interdisciplinary Wellcome-Trust project called SHaME (Sexual Harms and Medical Encounters: shame.bbk.ac.uk), which explores medical and psychiatric aspects of sexual violence. In the past few years, her research has also focused on questions of humanity, militarisation, and pain. Her books have ranged from the social and economic history of Ireland, to social histories of the British working classes, to cultural histories of military conflict between 1830s to the present. She has worked on the history of the emotions, particularly fear and hatred, and the history of sexual violence. Most recently, she is the author of The Story of Pain: From Prayer to Painkillers and War and Art: A Visual History of Modern Conflict.

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Imani Jacqueline Brown

Imani Jacqueline Brown is an artist, activist, and researcher from New Orleans, LA. Her work investigates extractive financial, environmental, and labor practices to expose the layers of violence and resistance that comprise the crumbling societal foundations of the U.S. and Louisiana. Imani orients her practice toward the elusive flicker of justice on the horizon, knowing that our world will not find balance until reparations are won. Imani is the founder of Fossil Free Festival, a biennial gathering of art, music, food and conversations about the ethical contradictions of fossil fuel philanthropy; the Fest celebrates the foreseeable end of the Fossil Fuel Era. Imani received an MA from the Centre for Research Architecture (CRA) at Goldsmiths, University of London. Presently, she is a Visiting Researcher at the CRA, a Visiting Lecturer in Environmental Architecture at the Royal College of Art, and an Economic Inequality Fellow with Open Society Foundations.

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Analía Ferreyra Carreres

Analía Ferreyra Carreres is a student at the MA in Literature, Culture and Media at Lund University. She worked as a journalist for a decade, writing, translating and editing for several media outlets in Latin America, and taught storytelling for the last five years. She was a contributor to the narrative journalism book A mí no me va a pasar. Cómo entender la trata de personas desde sus historias (It’s not going to happen to me. How to understand human trafficking through stories), (2015). Her research interests lie in the uses of literature as a tool for social change, narrative practices as a way to foster community, new materialisms, and the healing possibilities of storytelling in the context of extreme gender violence.

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Neil Chapman

Neil Chapman is an artist, writer and researcher. His work explores material textual practices, questions concerning visuality, art-philosophy interdisciplinarity, collaborative method and the histories of these themes. In 2011 he completed a PhD at the University of Reading on the new currency of writing in art practice. His book Diagrams for Seriality(Copy Press, 2014) makes that research available for a wider readership and has been described as a “startling meditation on the relations of seeing to saying” (Simon O’Sullivan). Recently, he has published in E.R.O.S, Performance Research and Haunt Journal. For a number of years Neil Chapman has been working in collaboration with artist and writer David Stent (West Dean College). Their ongoing series of residencies entitled Writing As Occupation explore the effects of place and technology on writing. Neil Chapman is a Senior Lecturer at Falmouth University, where he teaches Art Practice, Critical Studies and Art Research.

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Paolo Cirio

Paolo Cirio works with legal, economic, and cultural systems of the information society. He investigates social fields impacted by the Internet, such as privacy, democracy, finance, and intellectual property. He shows his research and intervention-based works through artifacts, photos, installations, videos, and public art. Cirio has exhibited in international museums and has won prestigious art awards. His artworks have been covered by hundreds of media outlets worldwide and he regularly gives public lectures and workshops at leading universities.

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Tom Cubbin

Tom Cubbin is a design historian whose work explores the role of making in material cultures of sex. Tom’s research project, entitled ‘Crafting Desire: An International Design History of Gay Fetish Making,’ is funded by Riksbankens Jubileumsfond (2019-2021). The project uses design historical methods to explore what the development and mediation of skills, aesthetics, concepts and images in the gay fetish world can tell us about broader changes in the socio-economic status of gay men in Europe and North America since the 1960s. More information about the project is available here.

Tom’s previous work examined histories of critical artistic design practice in the Soviet Union, which culminated in a monograph entitled Soviet Critical Design: Senezh Studio and the Communist Surround (London: Bloomsbury, 2019).

Since 2016, Tom has worked closely with education in the BA and MA programmes in design at HDK, and has been primarily responsible for implementing design studies within the curriculum.

Tom holds a PhD from the University of Sheffield, and an MA in History of Design from the Royal College of Art in London, where he has also worked as a visiting lecturer in the school of Critical and Historical Studies.

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Jörgen Dahlqvist

Jörgen Dahlqvist is a playwright and director. Since 2003, he has been the artistic director of Teatr Weimar. He held the position as the dean of the Malmö Theatre Academy between 2009 and 2012, where he now also works as a senior lecturer. He was the project coordinator for the research project Ögonblickets Anatomi (2012-2014) at Malmö Theatre Academy, funded by the Swedish Research Council. 

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Julie Valentin Dind

Julie Dind is a scholar and artist obsessed with obsession and the performance of the non-normative social body. She is a PhD student in Theatre Arts and Performance Studies at Brown University. Her work seeks to explore performance and performativity outside of the realm of language, expression and communication. Her practice deals with what the French poet and educator Fernand Deligny as her artistic and scholarly father described as the “place that is not the place of saying,” art outside the boundaries of language. She is proudly Autistic, and aims to use her time at Brown to “crip” performance studies. Her work is located at the intersection of performance studies, disability studies and philosophy. Her research deals with butoh and Art Brut, which represent two of her long-standing obsessions. She has dedicated the past ten years to learning butoh.

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James Duffy

Is currently an MFA student at the Fine art department of Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg.

Their current enquiry focuses on the structural and political complexities of identity through self-representational works that include video, writing and performance. This archive of work is continually reframed and reworked to destabilise the performativity of self.

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Andjeas Ejiksson

Andjeas Ejiksson (b. 1978) is an artist, writer and editor, living in Stockholm, Sweden. His practice is based on the interim spaces and transformations of language and the experiences that emerge in moments of translation. A special field of interest is the modalities of governance in the contemporary liberal democracy. The work is mainly text- and performance based. Ejiksson has been a researcher at the Royal Institute of Art in Stockholm (2014), before that at the Jan van Eyck Academy in Maastricht (2008–2009), and at the moment he is a doctoral candidate at the Valand Academy in Gothenburg. Ejiksson’s most recent work is a film and performance work, Television Without Frontiers, for the Swedish Public Art Agency (2019).

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Olle Essvik

Olle Essvik is an artist, publisher and senior lecturer working and living in Gothenburg. Essvik works with themes relating to the digital as well as to technology in a human context, touching on notions of everyday life, repetition, and time. The outcome of his art practice could be a book, a publication, or a sculpture, in which traditional materials and techniques like wood and bookbinding converge with programming and code.

Essvik have written books about the history of media art in relation to utopias within the research project Virtual utopias. Since 2014 he has been working with the art and research project The Enemies of Books, a project about bookbinding and publishing in relation to digital media, time and code. He has also been involved, as an artist and writer, in research projects about computer games and algorithms as an artform. Essvik has exhibited in national and international museums and have lectured and conducted workshops at various institutions. He also runs an experimental publishing house rojal.

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Garðar Eyjólfsson

Garðar Eyjólfsson holds an B.A (Honours) degree in Product Design from Central Saint Martins, London and a M.A (Cum Laude) Contextual Design from Design Academy Eindhoven. He mixes contextual, critical and narrative research in his work as a means to explore & translate zeitgeist topics. Utilizing a variety of mediums to manifest his voice, ranging from; artefacts, scenography, curation, fiction, video, performance, dialog and writing.

Garðar is the program director of MA Design Explorations & Translations program at the Iceland University of the Arts. Balancing academia with studio practices his work ranges from developing his own projects, curating exhibitions, advising in the public and private sector, project managing and conducting workshops. Garðar also writes in various publications and gives public talks across platforms, often in the form of lectures and dialog in conferences, symposium and radio.

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Maryam Fanni

Maryam Fanni is a PhD student in Design at HDK Academy of Design and Crafts since 2018. She is a graphic designer educated at Konstfack University of Arts, Crafts and Design. Apart from specializing in design for printed matter, a focus in her artistic practise is investigations of public space and rights to the city. Her latest solo show was in Västerås konstmuseum in 2019, on the topic of outdoor advertising companies and private-public partnerships.

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Benjamin Gerdes

Benj Gerdes is an artist, writer, and organizer working in video, film, and related public formats, individually as well as collaboratively. He is interested in intersections of radical politics, knowledge production, and popular imagination. His work focuses on the affective and social consequences of economic and state regimes, investigating methods for art and cultural projects to contribute to social change. His projects emerge via multiple articulations from long-term research processes conducted in dialogue with activists,  trade unionists, architects, urbanists, geographers, and archival researchers. Exhibitions and screenings include the Centre Pompidou, National Gallery of Art (U.S.), New Museum (U.S.), Rotterdam International Film Festival, and the Tate Modern. Publications include October, Public, The Journal of Aesthetics + Protest, Incite! and Rethinking Marxism. He currently leads a professor group and seminar on logistics and infrastructure at the Royal Institute of Art in Stockholm.

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Fredrik Haller

Fredrik Haller is a playwright and director and part of the performance arts collective Teatr Weimar. He works as a senior lecturer in dramaturgy at Malmö Theatre Academy.

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Jennifer Hayashida

Jennifer Hayashida is a poet, translator, and artist, born 1973 in Oakland, California, today based in Gothenburg and New York. In 2018, she debuted with the poetry collection A Machine Wrote This Song (Gramma Poetry) and has translated poets including Athena Farrokhzad, Ida Börjel, and Burcu Sahin. Hayashida is since 2018 a doctoral researcher at Valand Academy, with the project Feeling Translation, which explores translation as scene and event in relation to race, the body, and the nation-state.

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Ryan Michael Hoover

Ryan Hoover is an interdisciplinary artist and researcher actively addressing the impact of emerging technologies on our more-than-human world. Often operating at the intersection of digital and biological systems, he develops software, hardware, and biomaterials to create novel solutions to contemporary issues and open new understandings of our shared future. He teaches digital and biological fabrication at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and is a member of the board at the Baltimore Under Ground Science Space. He is the lead developer of Xylinus, a tool for novel control of 3D printers, integrated into the Rhino/Grasshopper CAD platform. His current areas of research are developing biocement structures for oyster habitat restoration, studying how knowledge is created and exchanged in interdisciplinary teams, and centering ethics in unconventional biotechnology education. His work is exhibited, downloaded, and put to use in galleries, labs, and studios around the world.

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Zakiyyah Iman Jackson

Zakiyyah Iman Jackson is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Southern California. Professor Jackson is the author of Becoming Human: Matter and Meaning in an Antiblack World published by New York University Press, “Sexual Cultures” series. Her research explores the literary and figurative aspects of Western philosophical and scientific discourse and investigates the engagement of African diasporic literature, film, and visual art with the historical concerns, knowledge claims, and rhetoric of Western science and philosophy. Professor Jackson is at work on a second book, tentatively titled “Obscure Light: Blackness and the Derangement of Sex-Gender.” Jackson’s work has appeared in Feminist Studies, e-flux, Gay and Lesbian Quarterly, Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social Sciences, South Atlantic Quarterly, and Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, and Technoscience.

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Monika Jaeckel

Monika Jaeckel is an artist, writer and performer based in Berlin and London. She has a background in artistic performance and new media and is currently undertaking a practice-based PhD within the Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media (CREAM) at Westminster University.

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Esaias Järnegard

Esaias Järnegard is a composer and PhD student at the Academy of Music and Drama, University of Gothenburg.

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Hanna Järvinen

Biography coming soon

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Rahma Khazam

Dr. Rahma KHAZAM is a researcher and art historian affiliated to Institut ACTE, Sorbonne Paris 1. She received her Ph.D. from the Sorbonne in aesthetics and art theory. Her research spans the fields of contemporaneity, modernism, image theory, speculative realism and new materialism and she has published articles on these and other topics in exhibition catalogues, edited volumes and academic journals. She recently completed an edited volume on the work of the artist Franck Leibovici. A member of AICA (International Association of Art Critics), NECS (European Network for Cinema and Media Studies) and EAM (European Network for Avant-Garde and Modernism Studies), she received the AICA France Art Criticism Award in 2017.

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O’Doherty & Kovacs

Kata Kovács and Tom O’Doherty have worked as a collaborative duo since 2011. Their work combines elements of durational and time-based art, minimalist movement, and electroacoustic music and sound. They are interested in processes, sounds, and movements that come close to imperceptibility, and the ways in which this material can be transformed through repetition, patterning, layering, and archiving. They have exhibited and presented work at Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California; Serralves Museum, Porto; National Museum of Contemporary Art (Chiado), Lisbon; Kunstquartier Bethanien, Berlin; Kunstkraftwerk, Leipzig; and Digital in Berlin’s Kiezsalon series, Berlin, among others. They live and work in Berlin, Germany.

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Lars Kristensen

Lars Kristensen is a Senior Lecturer in Media Arts, Aesthetics and Narration at the University of Skövde where he teaches film history, dramaturgy and game analysis. His research focuses on Eastern European filmmaking and Marxist approaches to moving images. Current research topics include bicycle cinema, Marxism and the intersection between computer games and fine art. He is the editor of Art and Game Obstruction (Rojal 2016) and Postcommunist Film – Russia, Eastern Europe and World Culture (Routledge, 2012), and co-editor of three essay collections on Marx and the moving image. He regularly reviews Russian films on the website KinoKultura and his articles has appeared in academic journals like Studies in Eastern European Cinema, Games and Culture and Eleven Thesis.

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Onkar Kular

Onkar Kular is Professor of Design at HDK Valand, Academy of Art & Design and Programme coordinator for PLACE (Public Life, Arts, Critical Engagement) at the Artistic Faculty, University of Gothenburg. His research is disseminated internationally through commissions, exhibitions, education, and publications. His work is in the collection of the CNAP, France, and Crafts Council, UK. He has guest-curated exhibitions for The Citizens Archive of Pakistan, Karachi, and the Crafts Council, UK. He was Stanley Picker Fellow 2016 and Artistic Director of Gothenburg Design Festival, Open Week 2017 and Co-Artistic Director of Luleå Art Biennial 2022.

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Nobunye Levin

Nobunye Levin is a filmmaker, scholar and lecturer. Nobunye’s filmmaking practice and research is concerned with the politics of aesthetics and decolonial feminist and anti-racist thought and practice as it relates to and is realised through film praxis. Her work is informed by the epistemic, poetic and political possibilities of cinematic experimentation. She is preoccupied with feeling and thinking in, and through, film practice to produce politically affective cinematic experiences. Nobunye completed a practice-based PhD at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. She is a lecturer in the Film and Television department in the School of Arts at the University of the Witwatersrand. Nobunye is currently a postdoctoral research fellow in decolonising screen worlds in the ERC-funded Screen Worlds: Decolonising Film and Screen Studies project, situated at SOAS University of London.

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Marcus Lindeen

Marcus Lindeen is a director and a doctoral candidate in film and media at Stockholm University of the Arts.

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Gloria López-Cleries

Is currently an MFA student at the Fine art department of Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg. 

In the past few years, Gloria’s artistic research has focused on questions about the neoliberal rhetoric concerning emotional capitalism and the new online models of productivity, affection and collectivity. Focussed on disruptive mechanisms of the cyber-utopia rupture in the light of the expansion of models of neoliberal capitalism in social media, her projects invite to question and rethink those vocabularies and their reproduction. Her outcomes have been exhibited in different locations in Spain and published in informative and academic journals as articles.

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Tero Nauha

Tero Nauha is a performance artist, the professor in Live Art and Performance Studies (LAPS) at the Theatre Academy of the University of the Arts Helsinki, and a postdoctoral fellow at the Academy of Finland funded postdoctoral research project ‘How To Do Things With Performance?’. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies in 2017. He defended his doctoral research at the Theatre Academy of the University of the Arts in Helsinki in January 2016. He is the member of Performance Philosophy, Performance Studies International and the International Federation for Theatre Research. In 2015, he published his first fiction novel Heresy & Provocation for a Swedish publishing house Förlaget. His performance art projects have been presented at the Frankfurter Kunstverein, Theatrediscounter in Berlin, CSW Kronika in Bytom, Poland, Performance Matters in London, and at the New Performance Festival in Turku, among other venues.

teronauha.com

howtodothingswithperformance.wordpress.com/

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Sanne Kofod Olsen

Sanne Kofod Olsen (1970) is an cand.phil. and mag.art. in Art History (University of Copenhagen) and the Dean of the Faculty of Fine, Applied and Performing Arts at Gothenburg University.

Sanne has been working with contempoary art since the mid 90s as a curator, writer, teacher, organisor and manager. Her focus within the field of visual art is feminism, performance art, curating and art education.

Jobs: Vice Chancellor, Royal Danish Art Academy, Schools of Visual Arts (2014-18); director, Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde (DK) (2009-14), vice-chancellor, Funen Art Academy (2005-2009), curator, The Danish Arts Council & Danish Contemporary Art Foundation (merged) (1999-2005)

Academic functions: Committe member, Novo Nordic Foundation, Committee for Artistic and Art Historical Research (2011-2018); Censor, Art History, University of Copenhagen, Aarhus University (2001-), external lecturer, Art History, University of Copenhagen (2001-2009).

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Evangelia Papada

Evie is a researcher at the Department of Human Geography, University of Loughborough UK. Evie’s professional interests and activism have revolved around the theme of human mobility. She is the author of New Border: Hotspots and the European Migration Regime (London) Pluto Press.

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Vijai Maia Patchineelam

For a period of six-months in 2020, Vijai Patchineelam together with the artist Adrijana Gvozdenović were invited to co-direct CONA Foundation and run the public programing of the space. CONA Foundation is a not for profit artist’s initiative, which was founded in 2012 by the artists Hemali Bhuta and Shreyas Karle in the north of Mumbai, India. 

In 2017, Vijai edited the book Samba Shiva: The Photographs of Sambasiva Rao Patchineelam, published by Zum/IMS (Instituto Moreira Salles), Sao Paulo, Brazil. In Samba Shiva, Vijai revisits the photographic archive of his father, a scientist who immigrated to Brazil at the end of the 1970s. The artist proposed to himself the role of the editor, while the authorship of the book is credited to Sambasiva. This displacement of roles is part of a larger project that Vijai pursues in his PhD.

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Pilvi Porkola

Dr Pilvi Porkola is a post doc researcher, performance artist, writer and pedagogue.

2017-18 she was Professor of Artistic Research at the Performing Arts Research Centre of the Theatre Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki. She is the editor of Performance Artist’s 

Workbook: Essays on teaching and learning performance art (Uniarts 2017). Currently she is working as a post doc researcher in Finnish Academy funded project “How To Do Things with Performance?” in Theatre Academy, Helsinki, Finland.

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Oliver Ressler

Oliver Ressler lives and works in Vienna. He produces installations, projects in public space, and films on issues such as economics, democracy, migration, global warming, forms of resistance and social alternatives. He has completed thirty-two films that have been screened in thousands of events of social movements, art institutions and film festivals. Solo exhibitions: Berkeley Art Museum, USA; Alexandria Contemporary Arts Forum, Egypt; Wyspa Institute of Art, Gdansk; Lentos Kunstmuseum, Linz; Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporaneo – CAAC, Seville; MNAC – National Museum of Contemporary Art, Bucharest; SALT Galata, Istanbul. Ressler has participated in more than 350 group exhibitions, including Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid; Centre Pompidou, Paris; the biennials in Seville (2006), Moscow (2007), Taipei (2008), Lyon (2009), Venice (2013), Quebec (2014), Jeju (2017), Kyiv (2017) and at Documenta 14, Kassel, 2017 (exhibition organized by EMST). Ressler was the first price winner of the Prix Thun for Art and Ethics Award in 2016.

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Assunta Ruocco

Assunta Ruocco is an artist and researcher based in Nottingham, UK. Her practice focuses on the role of collaboration, technologies and spaces of production in the emergence of artworks. Assunta works with painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, digital technologies, and the relationships between these media, creating transdisciplinary durational projects that invite the intervention of human, and non-human collaborators at different stages within the creative process. Recent presentations include “Co-Working with Things’, paper presentation at Parse conference, 2019, ‘Our Days of Gold’, a two-person exhibition with Daniel T. Wheeler at the Italian Cultural Institute in Hamburg, Germany (2019), ‘Allez-Allez’, group exhibition curated by Juan D’Oultremont, Centre Wallonie Bruxelles, Paris, France (2022), group exhibition ‘Family and Other Ties’ at UCA Farnham, 2022, and ‘Index of Love, Labour and Care’, paper presentation at ‘Drawing in Relation’ conference organised by the Drawing Research Network at Loughborough University in June 2023.

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Stacey Sacks

Stacey Sacks is an actor/writer/director/researcher/clown and current PhD candidate in Performative and Mediated practices at Stockholm University of the Arts. Born in Zimbabwe, Sacks studied Performance and Social Anthropology at the University of Cape Town and completed the MA program ‘A Year of Physical Comedy’ at the Stockholm Academy of Dramatic Art in 2012. Sacks is the author, together with Nalle Laanela, of The Clown Manifesto (Oberon Books, 2015). 

Through a constellation of clowters (clowns/characters) the research project (de)composes intra-cultural, auto-ethnographic excavations and vivisections of Whiteness. It explores haunting intersections of history whilst performing, animating and satirising questions of W(w)hiteness, privilege and colonial logic. Through a series of trans-disciplinary corporeal, material and technological experiments the project draws on queer aesthetics of uncertainty and productive failure.

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Lisa Nell Samuels

Lisa Samuels is the author of many books of poetry, memoir, and prose, including Symphony for Human Transport, a Guardian 2017 top ten poetry book. Her essays and editing work focus on experimental modern transatlantic and transpacific literatures, and her theoretical innovations include deformance, bioautography, and soft text. She also collaborates with composers, makes soundwork and visual art, and works with film, including Tomorrowland (2017, directed by Wes Tank and based on Lisa’s book). Professor of English and Drama at the University of Auckland in Aotearoa/New Zealand, Samuels earned her PhD at the University of Virginia and is currently a visiting artist-scholar at VUB in Belgium. Her new book of prose-poetry and photographs is The Long White Cloud of Unknowing (Chax, 2019).

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Erik Sandelin

Erik Sandelin is a PhD candidate in Art, Technology and Design at Konstfack University of Arts, Crafts and Design, and KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. He is co-founder of Malmö-based interaction design and innovation studio Unsworn. Erik is not allergic to cats anymore.

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Gianfranco Selgas

Gianfranco Selgas is a PhD student in Spanish, specializing in Latin American Literature and Culture at Stockholm University. In his research project, Selgas examines political and aesthetic features that have to do with tensions between materialism, culture, and nature, in a corpus of contemporary works by Latin American authors. He is Assistant Editor of Iberoamericana – Nordic Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

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Kolbrún Inga Söring

Is currently an MFA student at the Fine art department of Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg. 

Inga’s current enquiry explores possibilities of using the body as an autonomous site of provocation, problematising cis-heteronormative ideals while questioning the deeply rooted ‘myth’ of masculine desire. By borrowing and rethinking HC Andersen’s The Little Mermaid  through a queer and trans lens, Inga sets out to appropriate the narrative with the tool of autotheory. Unpacking their own troubled relationship with said norms and desires within a framework of self-representational body politics, body modification and politics of desire.

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Gustav Thane

Biography coming soon

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Mercedes Vicente

Dr Mercedes Vicente is a curator, writer and researcher. She is Visiting Lecturer at the Royal College of Art in Critical & Historical Studies, London. She has held positions as interim Director of Education and Public Programmes at Whitechapel Gallery in London, Curator of Contemporary Art at Govett-Brewster Art Gallery in New Zealand, and Research Curatorial Assistant at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, among others. Her AHRC-funded PhD at the Royal College of Art focused on the work of early video artist Darcy Lange. Mercedes has curated numerous exhibitions at institutions such as Tate Modern, Ikon Gallery, Camera Austria and CCA NTU Singapore. Her extensive writing and editorial credits include books, exhibition catalogues and art journals. She is the editor of Darcy Lange: Study of an Artist at Work (Govett-Brewster Art Gallery and Ikon Gallery, 2008; Spanish edition EACC, 2012).

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